Policy Report: Guidance for International Youth Engagement in PVE and CVE

REPORT: Saltman, E. and Kirt, J. (June 2016) Guidance for International Youth Engagement in PVE and CVE: Youth Responses to Resolution 2250 and the UN Plan of Action to Prevent Violent Extremism, (London: Institute for Strategic Dialogue).

Over the last several months, ISD’s Youth Civil Activism Network (YouthCAN) has made a concerted effort to reach out to young activists and garner important feedback regarding the UN Plan of Action (PoA) and Resolution 2250 in relation to specific national and regional contexts. The YouthCAN UN PVE Survey was distributed to young activists between April – June 2016 and contained 25 questions addressing key elements of the UN PoA and Resolution 2250. The survey was distributed online to the YouthCAN network, as well as a range of international youth networks.

This report was launched at a United Nations side event 1 July 2016 and presents the findings from the YouthCAN UN PVE Survey in order to bridge the gap between international policymakers and the expressed needs and concerns of young activists. The full policy report can be found here

Youth Innovation Labs: A Model for Preventing and Countering Violent Extremism

PUBLICATION: Saltman E., Dow M. and Bjornsgaard K. (July 2016), Youth Innovation Labs: A Model for Preventing and Countering Violent Extremism, (London: Institute for Strategic Dialogue).

The following publication discusses the development, implementation and evaluation of Youth Innovation Labs. Labs are immersive, activist-led events that create a secure environment to facilitate capacity-building while giving participants the contacts, tools and resources needed to develop strategic campaigns for preventing and countering violent extremism. The purpose of this publication is to share the methodology and structure thatYouthCAN has developed, as well as the best-practices and outcomes from YouthCAN’s work with young activists and creatives.

The full publication can be found here.

Book Chapter: Female Radicalization to ISIS and the Role of Women in CVE

Saltman, E. and Frennett, R. (2016) ‘Female Radicalization to ISIS and the Role of Women in CVE’, in Chowdury Fink et. al. (eds.), A Man’s World? Exploring the Roles of Women in Countering Terrorism and Violent Extremism, (Abu Dhabi and New York: Hedayah and GCCS), pp. 142 – 163.

Abstract: Women have played significant roles in a number of contemporary terrorist organizations. A range of far-right, far-left and Islamist extremist organizations have utilized female forces for a variety of activities including logistics, recruitment, political safeguarding, operational leadership, suicide bombing and combat. The recent surge in female recruitment to groups such as the terrorist organization Islamic State of Iraq and al-Sham (ISIS) has brought this long lasting phenomenon into sharp focus. This trend is unfortunately often paired with misperceptions around the role of women within these violent networks and engendered responses to the radicalization of women. A more nuanced understanding of the roles women play in preventing and countering violent extremism (PVE and CVE) is therefore critical. This chapter explores the crucial roles that women play in countering the violent extremist narrative, by reaching a wider audience of those “at risk” of radicalization and bringing much-needed innovation into the CVE sector. Addressing gender dynamics in CVE work is significant as we see an increasing number of women being radicalized and recruited into terrorist networks like ISIS from all over the world.

Full publication available here: http://www.hedayah.ae/pdf/a-man-s-world-1.pdf

Written Evidence to the Home Affairs Committee – Counter Extremism Inquiry

Written evidence submitted by the Institute for Strategic Dialogue

Published 2 February 2016. Original document can be found via the UK Parliament Website here

The following written evidence is submitted to the Home Affairs Committee adding to the Countering Extremism Inquiry. As such, the Institute for Strategic Dialogue (ISD) would like to use its research and experience working to counter violent extremism to highlight evidence and findings relevant to this inquiry. In particular, ISD would like to touch upon the topic of preventing violent extremism (section 2), inter-sector relations in CVE (section 3), and the need for credible, targeted counter-narratives (section 4).

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