Politics, Nation and Identity in the Midst of Hungary’s Refugee Crisis

Originally Published by Policy Network 15 September 2015. Original linked here.

Hungarian political discourse has taken a dark turn as the refugee crisis has been enveloped with fear of a nation losing its identity. The current crisis that now dominates headlines has shown images of Syrian refugees quarantined within Hungarian train stations, protesting for the right to safely pursue new lives in Europe as asylum seekers. Yet even before the current crisis now affecting Hungary, despite being a country with a relatively low influx and outflux of migrants, the topic of immigration has become increasingly salient with strong political divides.

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Anti-Semitism in Hungary: New Voices for Old Narratives

Originally Published by TBFF 20 January 2015. Original linked here.

Hungary’s seemingly recent political move away from ‘liberal European values’, towards localised and nationalist politics has caused a great deal of international concern and speculation. Strong electoral support of the right-wing conservative nationalist party, Fidesz, and far-right party, Jobbik, has increased in recent years, with notable far-right support coming from youth voters. Alongside this new wave of far-right politics has been an increasing xenophobic, and in particular anti-Semitic and anti-Roma, political rhetoric.

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Social Movements v Political Parties in Hungary

Originally Published by Policy Network 6 November 2014. Original linked here.

In Hungary, national, European and municipal elections this year have further solidified a unipolar party landscape, in which conservative party Fidesz has dominated. With the state of opposition parties in prolonged disrepair, liberal and leftwing voters continue to replace their electoral disillusionment with participation in protests and social movements. The most recent demonstrations taking place on 26 October and again on 28 October have seen an estimated 100,000 protest against Fidesz government initiatives.

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Commentary for LSE Europp on the Hungarian EP2014 Results

Originally Published by LSE Europp : 23 May 2014. Original linked here.

The elections in Hungary were a symbol of the population’s continued disappointment with the inability of the liberal-left opposition forces to unite

The Hungarian European Parliamentary election results are an accurate reflection of the majority population’s continued support of right wing and radical right parties on the one hand, and disappointment and disillusionment with liberal and left wing party options on the other. Continue reading

Hungary’s One-way Ticket to the EU: Hungary and the Copenhagen Criteria

Co-Authored with Lise Esther Herman. Originally Published by Books and Ideas : 10 April 2014. Link to PDF of article HERE giving bibliographic references and footnotes.

Although its action tends to be perceived as undemocratic by fellow EU member states, Hungary’s right-wing conservative party Fidesz has just been confirmed in power by a large majority. Hungary has become a test case for the Copenhagen Criteria, according to which the stability of democratic institutions is a condition for EU accession, but not for continued EU membership.

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Hungary’s Election: Solidifying the Radical Right

Originally Published by Policy Network: 8 April 2014. Original linked here

Despite accusations of gerrymandering and campaign tampering, Fidesz won an overwhelming victory against the left-wing opposition, while one in five Hungarians voted for Jobbik, making it the strongest far-right party in the EU.

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Fidesz (Super)Majority? Right and Radical Right Parties Dominate Hungarian Elections

Originally Published in Visegrad Insight: 7 April 2014. Original linked here.

Yesterday, Hungarians went out to cast their vote for the seventh democratic national elections. Although over 96% of the votes have been counted, onlookers remain tense to see whether or not right wing conservative party, Fidesz, will be able to maintain its two-thirds majority in parliament. Continue reading